The 1920s Quiz

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Question 1
What effect did the Bolshevik Revolution have on the American people?

A
Americans celebrated the successful Russian revolution.
B
The American public became fearful that communism and anarchism could take hold in America.
C
Americans were much more eager to welcome Russian immigrants into the country with open arms.
D
Americans were largely unconcerned with Russia and its revolution.
Question 1 Explanation: 
The Russian Revolution combined with a series of anarchist terrorist attacks created a deep fear and distrust of immigrants amongst the American public. Americans were terrified that the same radical communist ideas that took root in Russia could destabilize the United States as well. The "Red Scare" would grip the nation; foreigners and radical thinkers came under fire as potential threats.
Question 2
What was the overwhelming public reaction to the steelworker strike and others like it that were occurring across America in 1919?

A
Most Americans supported the laborers and their demands of higher wages and a shorter workday.
B
Most Americans disapproved of the strikes strictly because of their negative impacts on the American economy.
C
Most Americans viewed the strikes as fomenters of communism.
D
Most Americans were unaware that the strikes were taking place.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Thanks in large part to propaganda efforts in the media, most Americans saw the striking laborers as "Red agitators" seeking to impose communist ideals on the American economy. This lack of public support resulted in the vast majority of labor strikes in 1919 and 1920 failing to achieve their goals.
Question 3
Which of the following best describes the actions taken by Marcus Garvey in the 1920s to help combat a growing racial unrest in the United States?

A
Garvey founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association to help build pride and unity in the African American community.
B
Garvey advocated for an African American militia to rise up against corruption and unfair treatment.
C
Garvey was elected to the House of Representatives and proposed a series of laws to help promote equality and fair treatment for African Americans.
D
Garvey fought to integrate African Americans into predominantly white communities and institutions.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Garvey's activism through the UNIA was a huge step forward in establishing a pride and identity for the African American community in America. He promoted the notion that African American community should carve out their own spaces (even going so far as supporting the idea of founding their own African nation) by creating their own businesses and strengthening their own communities.
Question 4
Which of the following best describes the Warren G. Harding presidency?

A
Harding and his cabinet were very successful at rebuilding the nation's trust in American government.
B
Harding demonstrated tremendous political, economic, and strategic skill throughout his two terms in office.
C
Harding and his administration were marked by numerous examples of scandal and cronyism.
D
Harding's administration was unremarkable in that there were no notable positive or negative events.
Question 4 Explanation: 
President Harding surrounded himself with political allies and friends that routinely generated scandal through their acts of corruption. One of the most notable scandals included the illegal leasing of oil reserves in Teapot Dome, Wyoming and Elk Hills, California that resulted in the conviction of Harding's Secretary of the Interior, Albert Fall.
Question 5
What was the significance of the Five-Power Treaty signed by America, Japan, Britain, France, and Italy in 1922?

A
The treaty set the stage for World War II.
B
The treaty was the largest international trade deal that had ever been negotiated to date.
C
The treaty was the first successful negotiation in history between countries on three separate continents.
D
The treaty was the first international disarmament agreement of the modern era.
Question 5 Explanation: 
The Five-Power Treaty was an agreement to limit the size of the participating nations' navies. An international agreement of this nature had never been put in place in the modern era.
Question 6
What was the primary weakness of the Kellogg-Briand Pact which would eventually be signed by 62 nations?

A
There was no way to enforce the pact's ban on warfare.
B
Popular support for the pact quickly dried up and it would be universally revoked.
C
The wording of the pact left its aims open to conflicting interpretations depending upon its translation.
D
The pact was signed by participating nations, however most of the signers lacked the political authority to endorse the treaty on behalf of their countries.
Question 6 Explanation: 
The Kellogg-Briand Pact was impactful in its mission to eliminate warfare from the earth; however, the pact lacked any way to hold participants accountable should the pact be broken. As a result, the Kellogg-Briand Pact remained a largely symbolic gesture.
Question 7
How did the increased availability of electricity affect American industry in the 1920s?

A
Electricity was not widely available in America until well into the 1930s and thus it had little impact on American industry.
B
Electricity was more expensive than steam power which meant factories that used electricity had slimmer profit margins.
C
Electricity was less expensive than steam power which meant products became cheaper to produce and purchase.
D
Electricity was extremely dangerous and led to an exponential increase in the number of factory explosions in the 1920s.
Question 7 Explanation: 
Electricity helped businesses to cut the steep operating costs associated with steam power. As a result, many industries passed some of their savings on to consumers by lowering prices on manufactured goods.
Question 8
Which of the following is the best example demonstrating the growth of the American consumer economy in the 1920s?

A
Electricity became widely available in American homes.
B
Demand grew for new devices like refrigerators, radios, and vacuum cleaners and they became more commonplace in American homes.
C
Americans participated in anti-communist rallies in growing numbers.
D
American international trade stayed relatively consistent throughout the decade.
Question 8 Explanation: 
Americans had access to a wide variety of goods and appliances at steadily decreasing prices. At the same time, both advertising and the notion of buying on credit became more commonplace as ways to help spur the increased purchasing power of the American public.
Question 9
What impact did the automobile have on the American economy?

A
Automakers employed millions of Americans throughout the 1920s.
B
Increased automobile ownership created growth in car-related industries and road-side businesses.
C
Henry Ford's invention of the automobile assembly line revolutionized mass production.
D
all of the above
Question 9 Explanation: 
The automobile's usage nearly tripled in the 1920s. As a result, the need for car-related materials like tires and petroleum products created further demand for industrial growth. Additionally, the freedom provided by the automobile gave Americans the opportunity to commute to jobs and stores that had formerly been outside of their reach.
Question 10
Which of the following offers the best summary of the American economy during the 1920s?

A
All areas of the American economy thrived in the 1920s.
B
While the industrial sector flourished, American farmers, coal miners, and railroad workers found it more difficult to make ends meet.
C
While agriculture saw a boom, American industry could not withstand losing the boost it had enjoyed during the war.
D
The entire American economy faced steep declines in the 1920s.
Question 10 Explanation: 
The combination of increased access to electricity and the rise of American consumerism helped fuel successes for many American industries in the 1920s. On the other hand, falling post-war food prices crippled many farmers who had previously thrived. The prosperity of steam-era industries like the railroad and coal mining also declined following the rise of electricity and the automobile in the 1920s.
Question 11
What did the Nineteenth Amendment add to the United States Constitution?

A
It guaranteed African Americans the right to vote and hold public office.
B
It guaranteed women the right to vote to vote and hold public office.
C
It made the production, sale and consumption of alcohol illegal.
D
It made the production, sale and consumption of alcohol legal.
Question 11 Explanation: 
The ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment was a landmark moment in women's rights. Over eight million American women would vote for the first time in the elections held throughout 1920.
Question 12
What was the common term used to describe the "liberated women" of the 1920s who famously wore bobbed haircuts and more flamboyant and revealing clothing?

A
Rosies
B
Lucies
C
flappers
D
jazzers
Question 12 Explanation: 
Flappers, as they were known, were a generation of women who actively rebelled against the conventional expectations of how women were “supposed to” behave. They made bold decisions in their style and conduct that stood in stark contrast to the commonly accepted ways American women had carried themselves in the past.
Question 13
What effect did mass media have upon American society?

A
News coverage become more widespread resulting in a more informed public.
B
Advertising became more ubiquitous throughout daily life.
C
Radio broadcasts and newspaper coverage raised interest in professional sports.
D
all of the above
Question 13 Explanation: 
The mass media explosion of the 1920s revolutionized the way Americans accessed information and entertainment. Radios, newspapers, record players, and movie theaters gave Americans new and exciting ways to both take in news and enjoy their free time.
Question 14
What was the name given to the boom in African American cultural creativity that emerged from New York City in the 1920s?

A
The Urban Enlightenment
B
The Harlem Renaissance
C
The New York Knickerbockers
D
The Brooklyn Boom
Question 14 Explanation: 
The Harlem Renaissance helped bring the African American cultural experience to the forefront. Wordsmiths like Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Claude McKay used their craft and unique perspective to create profoundly influential works promoting African American pride and understanding.
Question 15
Which improvisational musical art form emerged in the 1920s as a unique mix of blues and southern ragtime?

A
soul
B
swing
C
jazz
D
rock n' roll
Question 15 Explanation: 
Jazz music saw a swell in popularity thanks in large part to the emergence of mass media forms like radio and phonographs that allowed the music to be heard all across the nation and not just in live performances. Jazz would play a key role in bringing African American culture into the fold as a key part of the American cultural landscape.
Question 16
Which of the following was a negative consequence of the Eighteenth Amendment's prohibition of alcohol?

A
The entire American economy suffered catastrophic harm due to the loss of alcohol-related industries and agriculture.
B
The overall health of the American public declined.
C
America became a laughing stock in the international community.
D
There was a rise in organized crime focused on supplying illegal alcohol to Americans.
Question 16 Explanation: 
Prohibition led to the emergence of a multi-million-dollar black market for the sale and distribution of alcohol. Crime bosses rose to power in major cities and were able to use the profits from their illegal ventures to gain power in government and businesses.
Question 17
What was the unifying theme linking the writers of "the lost generation"?

A
a disappointed and critical view of American values and ideals
B
satisfaction with the newfound opportunities in post-war America
C
hopefulness for a world without warfare
D
a disdain for traditional European arts centers like Paris and Venice
Question 17 Explanation: 
Writers like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Sherwood Anderson shared a dissatisfaction with American culture. They, along with other common-minded "lost generation" writers, felt that Americans in the post-war era were too preoccupied with the notions of success, consumerism, and materialism.
Question 18
Which of the following would be considered an indication of the rising sense of American nativism that took place in the 1920s:

A
American trade continued to thrive at home and abroad
B
The Emergency Quota Act and National Origins Act limited immigration numbers based upon nationality
C
Baseball rose in popularity thanks to live radio coverage of games and an increased coverage in newspapers
D
all of the above
Question 18 Explanation: 
Congress passed the Emergency Quota Act and National Origins Act in response to growing fears that immigrants were taking American jobs. There was also the fear that immigrants brought with them a potential for radical political action.
Question 19
What was the main issue at the heart of the 1925 Scopes trial?

A
John Scopes broke a Tennessee law banning the teaching of evolution instead of the Christian fundamentalist view of creationism.
B
John Scopes refused to teach evolution to his science students and instead chose to teach the biblical view of creation.
C
John Scopes was using his teaching position to try and influence his students with communist ideas.
D
John Scopes broke the law and tried to use his students to help participate in a protest against prohibition.
Question 19 Explanation: 
The Scopes trial was one of the first trials to receive national coverage in the mass media era. As a result, the case brought the notions of Christian fundamentalism to the national political stage and exposed an emerging regionalism on certain moral issues.
Question 20
What was significant about Alfred E. Smith, the losing candidate in the election of 1928?

A
Smith was the first state governor to run for President.
B
Smith was the first African American nominee for President.
C
Smith was the first Roman-Catholic nominee for President.
D
Smith was the oldest man to ever run for President.
Question 20 Explanation: 
Al Smith ran on a popular platform to end prohibition and promote policies to strengthen American cities. However, Smith was targeted by opponents for his Catholic background and lost the election in a landslide to Herbert Hoover.
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